The Path: Possessions

Life can be difficult, filled with much pain and suffering. But what makes life worth living are the people in our lives— the people we give to and the people that give to us. The act of giving need not be lavish or expensive to make a difference in someone’s life. It simply needs to be the kind of giving that acknowledges the recipient's value in the world. 


 
 Michael Orevba was 12 years old when he and his family moved to the U.S. from Nigeria in 2002. His mother and his 4 siblings found Church in Bethesda right away - the first and only church they have attended since coming to this country.  He grew up and lived in the Bethesda community for years, before moving to Washington, D.C., to join the Development Impact Evaluation Team at the World Bank. His work now takes him to West Africa and Southeast Asia, where he designs protocols for data quality checks on survey rounds in Nepal and Libera, works with principal investigators to design thorough plans for analyzing the collected data, and contributes to reports and briefs at the Bank. Michael’s work on agricultural projects seeks to improve the lives of rural farmers.  It’s Michael’s work and love for Church in Bethesda that helped the small congregation keep the blue doors open. At a critical juncture, in 2016, he said, “We can’t close these doors. I’ve been coming to this church with my family since I was 12 years old.”  The small group heard him and went into action. The multi-national, multi-cultural, and multi-denominational church has now tripled in size, with a new pastor, vibrant music, and an even greater mission to serve the community. Michael is a member of the Servant Leadership Group taking an active part in all phases of church life.

Michael Orevba was 12 years old when he and his family moved to the U.S. from Nigeria in 2002. His mother and his 4 siblings found Church in Bethesda right away - the first and only church they have attended since coming to this country.

He grew up and lived in the Bethesda community for years, before moving to Washington, D.C., to join the Development Impact Evaluation Team at the World Bank. His work now takes him to West Africa and Southeast Asia, where he designs protocols for data quality checks on survey rounds in Nepal and Libera, works with principal investigators to design thorough plans for analyzing the collected data, and contributes to reports and briefs at the Bank. Michael’s work on agricultural projects seeks to improve the lives of rural farmers.

It’s Michael’s work and love for Church in Bethesda that helped the small congregation keep the blue doors open. At a critical juncture, in 2016, he said, “We can’t close these doors. I’ve been coming to this church with my family since I was 12 years old.”

The small group heard him and went into action. The multi-national, multi-cultural, and multi-denominational church has now tripled in size, with a new pastor, vibrant music, and an even greater mission to serve the community. Michael is a member of the Servant Leadership Group taking an active part in all phases of church life.

Michael Orevba